Go to Razzle Dazzle welcome page. Tropical Vegetables
 

Lotus



Indonesian:
Teratai
Malay:
Teratai or Seroja
Tagalog (Filipino):
Baino
Thai:
Rak bua


Lotus photo.
Lotus plants
nul.
Lotus photo.
Dried lotus pods
nul.

The lotus plant is a tropical water lily. Most parts of the plant can be eaten, but it is the root (or rhizome) that is most popular. It is crisp, fine-grained and filled with holes running lengthwise through the root.

The young rhizome has a wonderful crisp texture and a great flavor. (We have never managed to find the roots in season. We missed them by a week in Cambodia.) The seed pods are also eaten; they were Jim's favorite dish when we visited southern China.

Market and storage tips -- Select firm, buff-colored pieces without soft spots, blemishes, or bruises. Size does not affect texture or flavor. Store the roots in a cool, dark place.

Cooking -- The flesh darkens rapidly when exposed to air. Prepare a mixture of 4 cups water to 1 tablespoon vinegar. After peeling the root, slice across the grain, dropping each slice into the acidic water. Cook quickly. The blanched slices can be added to a salad. Lotus root can also be stir-fried, steamed or braised.






Return to the previous veggie page.
VEGETABLE INDEX

Avocado  |   Bamboo Shoot  |   Banana Bud  |   Long Bean  |   Breadfruit

Celery Cabbage  |   White Cabbage  |   Cassava  |   Chayote  |   Chili  |   Eggplant  |   Garlic

Ginger  |   Bitter Gourd  |   Lotus  |   Okra  |   Green Papaya  |   Spinach  |   Taro

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Jim and Jamie Richter, http://gotouring.com/razzledazzle/
Website designed and created by Lois Richter, expanded by Jim.
Created 6/2003. All photos are © 2003 Jim Richter.